Botanical Journal: Daffodil

Botanical Name: Narcissus
Blooms Locally: Late March
Meaning of Flower: "Regard" or "Chivalry"

It's hard to think of spring without picturing the sweetness of the bright yellow daffodil. The daffodil is a true spring mascot, beckoning in the year's first days of genuine warmth and fading as quickly as spring often does. Daffodils are so abundant because they require almost no maintenance to grow. Simply plant the bulbs in late fall and revel in your gardening accomplishment as you watch the first green leaves poke through the soil in late March. In Wales, it is said that if you spot the first daffodil of the season, your year will be filled with good fortune. 

Daffodils are an excellent cut flower. They are lovely paired in an arrangement with forsythia branches. If cut, they should not be placed in a vase with other flower varieties, as they secrete a liquid that promotes wilting in other flower varieties. If you really want to mix them with other flowers, you can put the put stems in a cup of cool water overnight to drain the harmful substance from the stem. You will want to recondition them every few days by trimming the stems and replacing the water to keep them looking fresh.

Sophie+Co daffodil Washington DC Wedding Flowers
ophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie+Co daffodil Washington DC Wedding Flowers
Sophie+Co.April11,2017byBeccaOlcottPhotography-35.jpg
ophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC

Photos by Becca Olcott

Botanical Journal: Magnolia

 

Botanical Name: Magnoliaceae
Blooms locally: Late-March - Mid-April

Magnolia blooms are the queen of spring. A symbol of femininity and tenderness, they are thought to be one of the first ever flowering plants on earth. There are over 250 varieties of magnolia, and their flowers range from pink to purple, red and yellow. The commonly known Magnolia grandiflora is an evergreen variety, often growing to 40-100 ft. tall and 30-50 ft. wide and is prevalent locally and in the Southern and coastal United States. These stately trees are an excellent focal point for landscaping large spaces, and provide ample shade during the hot summer months. Their shallow, wide-reaching roots and dense shade prevent other flowers from prospering in close proximity, however, a bench beneath a magnolia grandiflora creates a lovely alcove for a leisurely afternoon.

Magnolia Liliiflora or Tulip Magnolia (pictured below) is the most commonly grown deciduous variety. The blooms on these trees are total show-stoppers and they are fantastic for landscaping small to medium areas because they have a smaller footprint than their magnolia grandoflora. Tulip magnolias are a stand-out bloomer, making a striking spring statement. Each year, we cross our fingers hoping they don't bloom before the last frost.

Ideal for large, hanging installations or dramatic centerpieces, the fuzzy buds and stunning blooms are one of our favorite parts of spring. We particularly love the unique gray tint of the branches. Standing underneath a tulip magnolia tree in full bloom on a spring day is nothing short of magic.

Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC

Photos by: Becca Olcott

Botanical Journal: Cherry Blossom

Botanical Name: Prunus
Blooms Locally: Late March, Early April

The cherry blossom tree is native to Japan where it is known as "sakura", a symbol of renewal and hope. Those of us in the DC area likely have memories of going to see the cherry blossoms at the Tidal Basin as a yearly spring tradition. Viewing the cherry blossoms is a custom that dates back hundreds of years. In Japan, they call this "hanami", which means "flower viewing" and specifically refers to afternoons spent sitting under the cherry blossoms during peak bloom. These trees are easy-going and quick to grow, which makes them a great option for landscaping and gardens locally. They require full sun and are self-pollinating, so it is ideal to plant 2 or 3 together, 10-20 feet apart.

Cherry blossom branches have a particularly graceful arch to them that we adore using in large arrangements. They aren't as crooked or jagged as your usual tree branch, which is something special when it comes to making elegant, large-scale arrangements

Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC

Photos by Becca Olcott

Early November Wedding in Washington, DC

As soon as I heard the vision Caroline and Charles had for their wedding, I couldn't wait to begin putting their floral plan together. For this November wedding at Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church, the color palette was pinks, greys and deep wine accents. For the pink, we used blushing bride protea, astrantia, yarrow and blush garden roses. We used burgundy ranunculus for the deep burgundy accents. Foraged greenery, eucalyptus and jasmine vine were woven throughout to give our arrangements a lush and romantic feel.  Caroline's classic dress with clean lines and gorgeous veil were the perfect compliment to her textured, bouquet with a slight cascade. As always, Sam Stroud Photography captured the day beautifully, and Kim Newton Weddings ensured that the day went off without a hitch.

Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC
Sophie + co. wedding and event florals in Washington, DC

Botanical Journal: Hellebore

 

Botanical Name: Helleborus orientalis
Grows locally: early-mid March

Commonly known as the hellebore, it is the perfect antidote for the end-of-winter blues and a true testament to resilience through the harshest of circumstances. These perennials tend to emerge during the last stretch of winter and the first breath of spring. Even if tackled by that rogue March snowstorm, they usually pop back up at the first sight of a warm, sunny day. These gals love to grow in clumps, and they are a dream for the novice gardener since they are shade and drought tolerant as well as evergreen, to keep your garden looking lush through the winter months.

Hellebore is a staple in our bouquets and arrangements because the gradient of the petals acts as a perfect transition for most of our wedding color palettes. They come in an array of purples, pinks and burgundys, and we particularly love the way they elegantly drape forward, adding poignant lines to any arrangement. We would describe the hellebore as strong and austere. She commands respect by nature of being so tenacious.

hellebore, Helleborus orientalis_Sophie + Co. florals for weddings and events in Washington, DC
hellebore, Helleborus orientalis_Sophie + Co. florals for weddings and events in Washington, DC
hellebore, Helleborus orientalis_Sophie + Co. florals for weddings and events in Washington, DC

Photos by Becca Olcott